soma for backpain

Soma, a muscle relaxant drug approved by the FDA in 1959, has proven to be an effective treatment for back pain in many patients. Soma is prescribed to treat acute musculoskeletal pain in the lower back. A 2009 clinical trial approved a low dose of 250 mg of Soma together with carisoprodol for back pain. Skeletal muscle relaxants are prescribed for muscle disorders, including lower back pain, neck pain, fibromyalgia, tension headaches, and myofascial pain syndrome.

For neck pain and back pain, skeletal muscle relaxants such as , tizanidine (Zanaflex), metaxalone carisoprodol and cyclobenzaprine appear to help with acute backaches. Randomized controlled trials of metaxalone have not been conducted since the 1970s. Skeletal muscle relaxants can be used as a complementary therapy for acute back pain.

The intensity of side effects of carisoprodol tends to decrease as therapy proceeds, as is the case with many other medications. The idea is to use them sparingly to give you a fair chance to get started, so you can reap the long-term results. While patients are in therapy, this medicine has a whole range of calming side effects that can affect patients.

Some people may get carisoprodol addiction and use it for something other than what it was intended for. The potency effect can be useful in other pain situations and may be more useful than open-chain opioids like methadone, levomethadone, ketobemidone, phenadoxone, and others.

No corresponding study was conducted on the association between age and the effects of carisoprodol in children under 16 years of age. A corresponding study on the age effectiveness of the drug has not yet been conducted in geriatric populations.

After the market launch, cases of abuse and dependence on carisoprodol (the active ingredient in Soma) were reported in patients with long-term use and substance abuse. However, most of these patients took other abuse medications, and no patient misused the drug.

SOMA has calming properties for back pain. In a study, 13 out of 17 patients who received Soma experienced sedation compared to 6 patients who received placebo. There were no side effects or impairment of mental or physical ability needed to perform dangerous tasks such as driving a motor vehicle or running machinery.

Reports of post-marketing motor vehicle accidents have been linked to the use of Soma. You should not use Carisoprodol if you have a history of substance abuse. If they are prescribed, you should only take them for short periods (2-3 weeks) as there is no evidence of their effectiveness after long use.

You should not use Carisoprodol or Soma if you have a history of substance abuse. If they are prescribed, you should only take them for short periods (2-3 weeks) as there is no evidence of their effectiveness after long use.

References

  1. El-Tallawy, S. N., Nalamasu, R., Salem, G. I., LeQuang, J., Pergolizzi, J. V., & Christo, P. J. (2021). Management of Musculoskeletal Pain: An Update with Emphasis on Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain. Pain and therapy10(1), 181–209. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40122-021-00235-2
  2. Carisoprodol effective for acute lower-back spasm. Inpharma Wkly. 1625, 13 (2008). https://doi.org/10.2165/00128413-200816250-00031
  3. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0149291804802832