Soma while Pregnant and Breastfeeding

Soma while Pregnant and Breastfeeding

Soma is a medication used as a muscle relaxant. The generic name of the drug is Carisoprodol. It belongs to the drug class called Skeletal Muscle Relaxants. It is practiced together with rest and other physical therapy. It can be utilized with other drugs as well.
Soma is converted into meprobamate, which is believed to relieve anxiety and cause sedation.
A review of studies from 2004 states that there is adequate evidence that Soma, Carisoprodol, and Robaxin are effective in treating acute back and neck pain compared to placebo. Still, there are only conflicting data on the effectiveness of Robaxin and Soma.

Can I take Soma while Pregnancy?

Can i take soma while pregnant

Pregnant women are now taking medication during pregnancy more often than their mothers ever were. Pregnant women assume that a drug is safe if their doctor prescribes it.
The FDA classifies medicines based on safety for use during pregnancy.
Five sections: A, B, C, D, and X, are used to distinguish the potential dangers to an unborn baby when a medicine is taken during pregnancy. Carisoprodol falls into category C.
Though the drug is not recommended for the woman during pregnancy, it is used only if your health care provider thinks that the benefit may surpass the risk.

Is Carisoprodol Safe for Breastfeeding?

Soma is not suitable for Breastfeeding. One report explained that the nursing infant is a little sleepier than expected, according to two case reports. It can let troublesome effects on infants.
A safety level of 3 indicates that the use of Soma in breastfed babies may cause minor side effects. Soma Breastfeeding Side Effects A mother who took Soma (700 mg, propoxyphene 70 mg, and paracetamol 900 mg three times a day) while breastfeeding her baby noticed unusual behavior and side effects in her baby. Studies from various scientific studies suggest that Soma can cause moderate side effects in breastfeeding mothers.

After one week, the mother nursed an infant 2 hours after breastfeeding and 3.5 hours after her previous dose with immeasurable serum concentrations of Carisoprodol (2 mg / l) and Meprobamate (4 mg / l). Light sedation was observed in short-term infants with a birth weight below the 10th percentile for gestation and Breastfeeding, and signs and withdrawal symptoms were observed after breastfeeding.
New mothers are prescribed safe drugs, but there are medications that new mothers should never take. Taking Soma while Breastfeeding can lead to permanent injuries or even the death of your baby.

What Side Effects does Soma have while Pregnant?

Soma is not recommended for a woman who is pregnant.
Its sedative properties may impair the mental or physical abilities required to perform potentially hazardous tasks such as driving a motor vehicle or operating machinery. If the drug has still been consumed, they may have withdrawal symptoms such as irritability, abnormal or persistent crying, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Are Muscle Relaxers Safe while Pregnant and Breastfeeding?

When it comes to Soma vs. Flexeril for pregnancy and Breastfeeding, Flexeril is recommended by doctors. It is a pregnancy B category drug and can be utilized in pregnancy only if needed. The drug has been examined in rats, mice, and rabbits at a dose up to 20 times the human dose and have reported no such evidence that will diminish fertility or harm the fetus. There is no enough research on pregnant women. Because animal reproduction examinations are not always imminent of human response, this drug should be practiced during pregnancy only if required.
While breastfeeding, the drug appears in the milk in a very small amount, and two infants tolerated it in the milk well. If a mother requires Flexeril, then there is no reason to stop breastfeeding. It can be used with proper care.

Conclusion

Taking Carisoprodol along with certain medications may increase the risk of side effects of these medications. If you are taking the medication Carisoprodol, your doctor will monitor you for possible side effects. And if you are already taking the medication, they may increase your dose of the medication.
Certain drugs are prescribed for specific conditions only. The benefits and risks may differ from person to person, according to their age, health, medical history, etc.

Consult your health provider before using any medications. Follow their advice and directions. If you find any difficulties, do not avoid them or try to manage them on your own; see your doctor immediately. While taking any medicine, the patient should be monitored closely.

References

Briggs GG, Ambrose PJ, Nageotte MP, Padilla G. High-dose carisoprodol during pregnancy and lactation. Ann Pharmacother. 2008 Jun;42(6):898-901. doi: 10.1345/aph.1L042. Epub 2008 May 6. PMID: 18460586. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18460586/ Accessed on 25/08/2021 https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a682514.html Accessed on 25/08/2021 U.S. Department of Health and Human Service, Food and Drug Administration. (2010). Medicine and Pregnancy.  Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/ucm118567.htm Accessed on 25/08/2021 Spencer, J, Gonzales III, L, and Barnhart, D. (2001). Medications in the breast-feeding mother. American Family Physician, 64(1), Retrieved from http://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0701/p119.html Accessed on 25/08/2021